Implications for the Role of Diet in Acne

Within the dermatology community, a general consensus has emerged that diet is unrelated to the etiology of acne. Except for 2 poorly designed studies, now more than 30 years old, there are few objective data to support this notion. In contrast, a large body of evidence now exists showing how diet may directly or indirectly influence the following 5 proximate causes of acne: (1) increased proliferation of basal keratinocytes within the pilosebaceous duct, (2) incomplete separation of ductal corneocytes from one another via impairment of apoptosis and subsequent obstruction of the pilosebaceous duct, (3) androgen-mediated increases in sebum production, (4) colonization of the comedo by Propionibacterium acnes, and (5) inflammation both within and adjacent to the comedo. This article will provide a review of the currently available literature on the association between diet and acne vulgaris as well as a discussion of the physiologic principles that may underlie this association.

Semin Cutan Med Surg 24:84-91 © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Purchase this article:

PURCHASE FOR $25

For unlimited access to all issues and articles:

If you do not subscribe to Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, you may purchase instant access for your personal use. Terms and conditions will apply (see Copyright & Terms of Use). If you need assistance, contact Susan Hite (scmsjournal@frontlinemedcom.com).