Richard CK Jordan

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Dec
2015
Vol. 34. No. 4

White lesions in the oral cavity: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment

Kyle Burke Jones, DDS | Richard CK Jordan, DDS, PhD, FRCPath

White lesions in the oral cavity are common and have multiple etiologies, some of which are also associated with dermatological disease. While most intraoral white lesions are benign, some are premalignant and/or malignant at the time of clinical presentation, making it extremely important to accurately identify and appropriately manage these lesions. Due to their similar clinical appearances, it may be difficult sometimes to differentiate benign white lesions from their premalignant/malignant counterparts. This review will discuss many of the most common intraoral white lesions including their clinical presentation, how to make an accurate diagnosis, and effective treatment and management strategies.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:161-170 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Dec
2015
Vol. 34. No. 4

Differential diagnosis and management of oral ulcers

Amanda Siu, DDS | Daniel M. Ramos, DDS, PhD | Katina Landon, DDS

The diagnosis and treatment of oral lesions is often challenging due to the clinician’s limited exposure to the conditions that may cause the lesions and their similar appearances. While many oral ulcers are the result of chronic trauma, some may indicate an underlying systemic condition such as a gastrointestinal dysfunction, malignancy, immunologic abnormality, or cutaneous disease. Correctly establishing a definitive diagnosis is of major importance to clinicians who manage patients with oral mucosal disease. Some of these diseases are infectious; however, most are chronic, symptomatic, and desquamative. Treatment and management requires an understanding of the immunopathologic nature of the lesion. This review will address how to differentiate and diagnose varying types of oral ulcers and provide a treatment strategy. 
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:171-177 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Dec
2015
Vol. 34. No. 4

HPV and oropharyngeal cancer: etiology and prognostic importance

Sue S. Yom, MD, PhD

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease, but the overwhelming majority of individuals clear the infection. A small percentage of individuals develop persistence of oncogenic HPV types, especially HPV-16; and as a result, squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the tonsils and base of the tongue. Over 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are now thought to be associated with oncogenic HPV infection. Immunohistochemistry for p16 protein is often used as a surrogate marker for oncogenic HPV in the oropharyngeal tissues, although alternative HPV DNA testing methods are under intensive study. The clinical profile of patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) differs quite notably from that of traditional head and neck cancer patients, and the prognosis for HPV-associated OPC is significantly better. As a result, experimental clinical trials are focused on de-intensification of therapies with the hope of preserving an improved long-term quality of life for these patients.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:178-181 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Dec
2015
Vol. 34. No. 4

Genital lichen planus: update on diagnosis and treatment

Kathleen Zendell, MD

Lichen planus (LP) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects both glabrous and mucosal skin. Although pathophysiology has not yet been fully defined, LP is a T-cell mediated disorder that demonstrates an increased Th1 cytokine expression as well as T-cell reactivity against basement membrane zone components. In males, genital LP often takes its more classic form as pink, shiny, flat-topped papules on the glans and coronal sulcus. In women, erosive disease is most common and often leads to significant scarring and sexual dysfunction. Therapeutic management is challenging, and control rather than cure is the goal. Topical corticosteroids remain first-line therapy, but some women will require systemic immunosuppressants to achieve remission. Surgery is less common for women with significant scarring who wish to resume sexual activity. Further research is needed on pathogenesis, and randomized controlled trials are necessary to better define best treatments for this chronic disease.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:182-186 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Dec
2015
Vol. 34. No. 4

Noninfectious genital ulcers

Carly Kirshen, MD, FRCPC, FAAD | Libby Edwards, MD, FAAD

Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet’s syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn’s disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:187-191 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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