Lindy P. Fox

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Mar
2014
Vol. 33. No. 1

Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 1: cytotoxic agents, epidermal growth factor inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors, and proteasome inhibitors

Milan J. Anadkat, MD | Rachel L. Kyllo, BS

Dermatologic toxicities have profound effects on patients
receiving chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Cytotoxic
chemotherapies are associated with a number of nonspecific
dermatologic adverse events including alopecia, mucositis,
and onychodystrophy. Targeted therapies including
epidermal growth factor inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors,
and proteasome inhibitors are associated with different
skin reactions that are class-specific. In Part 1 of this
review, we examine the presentations of the most common
dermatologic adverse events associated with the above
drugs and discuss the strategies used for their prevention
and treatment.

MORE
Mar
2014
Vol. 33. No. 1

Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 2: BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab

Jennifer Nam Choi, MD

The advent of novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents
and immunotherapies has dramatically changed the
arena of cancer treatment in recent years. BRAF inhibitors,
MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab are among the newer
chemotherapy drugs that are being used at an increasing
rate. Dermatologic adverse events to these medications
are common, and it is important for dermatologists and
oncologists alike to learn to recognize and treat such
side effects in order to maintain both patients’ quality of
life and their anticancer treatment. This review describes
the cutaneous side effects seen with BRAF inhibitors (eg,
maculopapular eruption, photosensitivity, squamoproliferative
growths, melanocytic proliferations), MEK inhibitors (eg,
papulopustular eruption), and ipilimumab (eg, maculopapular
eruption, vitiligo), with a mention of vismodegib
and anti-PD-1 agents.

MORE
Mar
2017
Vol. 36. No. 1

Hospital Dermatology, Introduction

Lindy P. Fox, MD

Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

MORE
Sep
2007
Vol. 26. No. 3

Inpatient Dermatology, Introduction

Lindy P. Fox, MD

This issue of Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery is dedicated to inpatient dermatology. During the past decade, the advent of managed care has drastically reduced the availability of inpatient beds for patients with dermatologic disease so that currently, most hospitalized patients requiring dermatologic care are seen by a consulting dermatologist.

MORE
Dec
2006
Vol. 25. No. 4

Introduction

Lindy P. Fox, MD

This issue of Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery is dedicated to the interface between dermatology and internal medicine.

MORE