Jeremy B. Green

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Sep
2015
Vol. 34. No. 3

A noninvasive approach to off-face skin laxity and tightening: a review of the literature

Kimberly Jerdan, MD | Sabrina Fabi, MD, FAAD, FAACS

Off-face skin scales tailored to each anatomical site can measure laxity and tightening of the neck, chest, arms, hands, abdomen, buttocks, and medial thighs. Although surgery may be indicated for major weight loss patients, other noninvasive modalities may be considered including: CO2 laser, bipolar radiofrequency, monopolar radiofrequency, microfocused ultrasound, and combination therapies. We provide a review of the literature for each modality and relevance to the off-face anatomical sites.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:118-128 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Sep
2011
Vol. 30. No. 3

Cosmeceuticals: Current Trends and Market Analysis

Fredric S. Brandt, MD | Alex Cazzaniga, MBA
The desire to maintain a youthful image combined with an emerging global market with disposable income has driven the development of many new industries. The cosmeceutical industry is based on the development and marketing of products that lie between cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Today, there are over 400 suppliers and manufacturers of cosmeceutical products, and the industry is estimated to grow by 7.4% by 2012. Although a number of products advertise predictable outcomes, the industry is largely unregulated and any consumers of cosmeceutical products should consult a dermatologist prior to use. This review will provide a snapshot of the current trends of this industry and provide an analysis of this multi-billion dollar market. Semin Cutan Med Surg 30:141-143 © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Sep
2011
Vol. 30. No. 3

Home-Use Laser and Light Devices for the Skin—An Update

Jeremy B Green, MD
Over the past several years, a number of home-use laser and light skin devices have been introduced for various indications, including photorejuvenation, hair growth, hair removal and acne treatment. Although these devices allow for privacy and a significant cost advantage, they are typically underpowered and afford lower efficacy than their in-office counterparts. A number of these devices have recently received FDA clearance. Although large clinical trials are lacking, dermatologists should familiarize themselves with the various options to help patients assess their clinical value. Semin Cutan Med Surg 30:144-147 © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Sep
2015
Vol. 34. No. 3

Noninvasive body contouring: cryolipolysis and ultrasound

Arisa E. Ortiz, MD | Mathew M. Avram, MD, JD

Over the past 5 years, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of fat. The clear trend is toward noninvasive fat removal technologies over more traditional forms of fat removal such as liposuction. While these devices do not yet approach the results seen with liposuction, noninvasive treatments are gaining popularity due to their ability to safely and effectively reduce fat with little downtime and typically no need for anesthesia. The optimal candidate is relatively fit with localized areas of adiposity, rather than an obese patient. It is important to note that there are numerous noninvasive fat devices including low-level light, radiofrequency, laser, cryolipolysis, and ultrasound. Some of these technologies have more robust data to support their efficacy than others. This review will focus on only 2 noninvasive fat technologies: cryolipolysis and ultrasound.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 34:129-133 © 2015 Frontline Medical Communications

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Sep
2011
Vol. 30. No. 3

Botanicals and Anti-Inflammatories: Natural Ingredients for Rosacea

Jason Emer, MD | Heidi Waldorf, MD
Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by cutaneous hypersensitivity. There are many therapeutic options available for the treatment of rosacea, but none are curative. Since the pathogenesis of rosacea remains elusive, it is not surprising that no single treatment is paramount and that many patients find therapies unsatisfactory or even exacerbating. Treatments are prescribed to work in concert with each other in order to ameliorate the common clinical manifestations, which include: papules and pustules, telangiectasias, erythema, gland hypertrophy, and ocular disease. The most validated topical therapies include metronidazole, azelaic acid, and sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur. Many other topical therapies, such as calcineurin inhibitors, benzoyl peroxide, clindamycin, retinoids, topical corticosteroids, and permethrin have demonstrated varying degrees of success. Due to the inconsistent results of the aforementioned therapies patients are increasingly turning to alternative products containing natural ingredients or botanicals to ease inflammation and remit disease. Additional research is needed to elucidate the benefits of these ingredients in the management of rosacea, but some important considerations regarding the natural ingredients with clinical data will be discussed here. Semin Cutan Med Surg 30:148-155 © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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