Ashish C. Bhatia

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Sep
2012
Vol. 31. No. 3

Decision Support in Dermatology and Medicine: History and Recent Developments

Art Papier, MD

This article is focused on diagnostic decision support tools and will provide a brief history
of clinical decision support (CDS), examine the components of CDS and its associated
terminology, and discuss recent developments in the use and application of CDS systems,
particularly in the field of dermatology. For this article, we use CDS to mean an interactive
system allowing input of patient-specific information and providing customized medical
knowledge-based results via automated reasoning, for example, a set of rules and/or an
underlying logic, and associations.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 31:153-159 © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Mar
2008
Vol. 27. No. 1

Imaging Techniques for the In Vivo Diagnosis of Melanoma

A.A. Marghoob, MD | Allan C. Halpern, MD | Alon Scope, MD | Azadeh Esmaeili

The ability to detect early melanoma remains of paramount importance in our efforts to
curtail deaths related to this malignancy. Fortunately, our clinical skills at recognizing the
varied clinical presentation of early melanomas are continuously improving. Our enhanced
clinical acumen together with improved awareness of the danger signs of melanoma has
resulted in a greater proportion of thin melanomas being diagnosed today as compared to
the past. The implementation and utilization of in vivo imaging technologies in clinical
practice promises to further enhance our ability to detect melanoma while this cancer is
still thin and easily curable. This article describes the utility and application of the in vivo
imaging technologies that are currently in clinical use today including dermoscopy, total
body photography, individual lesion photography, and reflectance confocal microscopy.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 27:2-10 © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
KEYWORDS melanoma, dermoscopy, total body photography, confocal, short term

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Mar
2008
Vol. 27. No. 1

Digital Image Analysis for Diagnosis of Skin Tumors

Andreas Blum, MD | Giuseppe Argenziano, MD | Iris Zalaudek, MD

Between 1987 and 2007, different groups developed digital image analysis systems for the diagnosis of benign and malignant skin tumors. As the result of significant differences in the technical devices, the number, the nature and benign/malignant ratio of included skin tumors, different variables and statistical methods any comparison of these different systems and their results is difficult. For the use and comparison of the diagnostic performance of different digital image analysis systems in the future, some principle basic conditions are required: All used systems should have a standardized recording system and calibration. First, melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions should be included for the development of the diagnostic algorithms. Critical analyses of the results should answer the question if in future only melanocytic lesions should be analyzed or all pigmented and nonpigmented lesions. This will also lead to the answer if only dermatologists or all specialities of medical doctors will use such a system. All artifacts (eg, hairs, air bubbles) should be removed. The number of variables should be chosen according to the number of included melanomas. A high number of benign skin lesions should be included. Of all lesions only 10% or better less should be invasive melanomas. Each system should be developed by a training-set and controlled by an independent test-set. Each system should be controlled by the user with the final decision and responsibility and tested by independent users without any conflict of financial interest.

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Sep
2012
Vol. 31. No. 3

Special Requirements for Electronic Health Records in Dermatology

Mark D. Kaufmann, MD | Shraddha Desai, MD

Government incentives and mandates to increase the meaningful use of electronic health
records (EHR), with subsequent disincentives by Medicare, have made a significant push
for dermatologists to adopt this technology into their practices. EHRs were originally
developed for primary care physicians; however, owing to the unique features of dermatology,
specialty-specific systems are a must. In this article, we discuss the special needs
of dermatologists when choosing an EHR system.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 31:160-162 © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Mar
2008
Vol. 27. No. 1

DNA Microarray Technology in Dermatology

Manfred Kunz, MD

In recent years, DNA microarray technology has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in a variety of skin diseases, including malignant melanoma, psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Many of the studies described herein confirmed earlier results on individual genes or functional groups of genes. However, a plethora of new candidate genes, gene patterns, and regulatory pathways have been identified. Major progresses were reached by the identification of a prognostic gene pattern in malignant melanoma, an immune signaling cluster in psoriasis, and a so-called interferon signature in systemic lupus erythematosus. In future, interference with genes or regulatory pathways with the use of different RNA interference technologies or targeted therapy may not only underscore the functional significance of microarray data but also may open interesting therapeutic perspectives. Large-scale gene expression analyses may also help to design more individualized treatment approaches of cutaneous diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 27:16-24 © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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