Meeting the Challenge of Atopic Dermatitis from Infancy to Adulthood, Introduction

MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS FROM INFANCY TO ADULTHOOD

Meeting the Challenge of Atopic Dermatitis from Infancy to Adulthood, Introduction

Mar
2017
Vol. 36. No. 2
Lawrence F. Eichenfield, MD

Dermatologists and primary care clinicians have been able to adequately manage most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), using long-standing and familiar nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions. However, many individuals have chronic or intermittent AD that profoundly affects their quality of life, and yet remain inadequately treated. Good skin care—hydration and moisturization—remains a cornerstone of management for all patients, for both acute and maintenance therapy, as is identification and avoidance of irritants that trigger flares. To bring AD flares under control, topical corticosteroids (TCS) often suffice. Topical calcineurin inhibitors—pimecrolimus or tacrolimus—are effective as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, both as alternatives for flare management (especially in delicate skin areas) and in maintenance regimens. Bacterial colonization and infection should be recognized and managed, and dilute bleach baths may be highly effective.

Eichenfield LF. Meeting the challenge of atopic dermatitis from infancy to adulthood, introduction. Sem Cutan Med Surg. 2017;36(Suppl 2):S35. https://doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2017.008.

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